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Use of additives in bakery products

16 March 202312 min reading

Additives are substances added to food products to enhance their flavor, texture, appearance, or shelf life. The use of additives in bakery products is a common practice in the food industry, as they can help to improve the quality and safety of these products. Flavor is a complicated and sometimes conflicting thing, but bitter blockers, flavor maskers and potentiators can help deliver the optimum flavor attributes desired.

One of the most common types of additives used in bakery products is emulsifiers. These substances help to mix oil and water-based ingredients together, which improves the texture and stability of the final product. Examples of emulsifiers used in bakery products include lecithin, monoglycerides, and diglycerides.


Another type of additive used in bakery products is preservatives. These substances help to prolong the shelf life of the products by preventing the growth of bacteria, mold, and other microorganisms. Common preservatives used in bakery products include sodium propionate, calcium propionate, and potassium sorbate.


Bakery products also commonly use enzymes, which aid in the fermentation process and improve the texture of the final product. Examples of enzymes used in bakery products include amylases, proteases, and lipases.


A final example of an additive used in bakery products is artificial sweeteners. These substances are used to sweeten products without adding calories. Examples of artificial sweeteners used in bakery products include saccharin, aspartame, and sucralose.


It is important to note that the use of additives in food products, including bakery products, is regulated by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in the United States. The FDA sets limits on the amount of each additive that can be used in a product and also sets guidelines for the labeling of products that contain additives.


Use of additives in bakery products is a common practice in the food industry, as they can help to improve the quality and safety of these products. Additives such as emulsifiers, preservatives, enzymes, and artificial sweeteners are commonly used in bakery products to enhance flavor, texture, appearance, and shelf life.


It is important to keep in mind, however, that not all additives are safe for consumption. Some additives have been linked to health concerns, such as cancer and allergic reactions. Therefore, it is important to be aware of the types of additives used in bakery products, and to consume them in moderation.


Additionally, some individuals may have dietary restrictions that prohibit the consumption of certain types of additives. For example, individuals with celiac disease or gluten sensitivities may need to avoid bakery products that contain gluten, a protein found in wheat, barley, and rye. Similarly, individuals with dairy allergies may need to avoid bakery products that contain milk or butter.


One way to avoid consuming unwanted additives is to purchase bakery products from local, independent bakeries. These bakeries often use fewer additives than large commercial bakeries, and may also use higher quality ingredients. Additionally, some bakeries may offer a selection of all-natural or organic products that are free from artificial preservatives, colors, and flavors.


While additives can be beneficial in enhancing the quality and safety of bakery products, it’s important to be aware of the types of additives used and to consume them in moderation. Individuals with dietary restrictions or health concerns may want to consider purchasing bakery products from local, independent bakeries or making their own bakery products at home.


Another important aspect to consider when discussing the use of additives in bakery products is the impact on the environment. Many of the synthetic additives used in the food industry are derived from fossil fuels and contribute to the depletion of non-renewable resources. Furthermore, the production and disposal of these additives can also contribute to pollution and damage to the environment.

To address these concerns, some bakery products manufacturers have started to use natural and organic additives, which are derived from renewable sources and are less harmful to the environment. Additionally, some companies have started to use sustainable packaging materials, such as biodegradable or compostable packaging, to reduce their environmental footprint.


Consumers can also make a difference by choosing to purchase bakery products that are made with natural and organic ingredients, and are packaged in sustainable materials. This can help to support companies that are making an effort to reduce their environmental impact and can also help to promote the use of more sustainable ingredients and packaging materials in the food industry.


The use of additives in bakery products can have a significant impact on both human health and the environment. While additives can be beneficial in enhancing the quality and safety of bakery products, it is important to be aware of the types of additives used and to consume them in moderation. Consumers can make a difference by choosing to purchase bakery products that are made with natural and organic ingredients, and are packaged in sustainable materials.


Another aspect that is often overlooked when discussing the use of additives in bakery products is the impact on small and local businesses. Many small and independent bakeries rely on traditional methods and natural ingredients, rather than using a large number of additives to enhance their products. These businesses often struggle to compete with larger commercial bakeries that use more additives and can produce goods at a lower cost.


In conclusion, the use of additives in bakery products can have a significant impact on human health, the environment, and small and local businesses. While additives can be beneficial in enhancing the quality and safety of bakery products, it is important to be aware of the types of additives used and to consume them in moderation. Consumers can make a difference by choosing to purchase bakery products from small and local bakeries that use natural and organic ingredients and traditional methods, which can result in more flavorful and healthier products. Supporting small and local bakeries can also help to promote the use of natural and additive-free bakery products and can help to support the local economy.


USE OF ADDITIVES IN BAKERY PRODUCTS

Additives are substances added to food products to enhance their taste, texture, appearance, or preservation. They are commonly used in the bakery industry to improve the quality and shelf life of bread, cakes, pastries, and other baked goods.


One of the most commonly used additives in bakery products is yeast. Yeast is a microorganism that ferments the sugars in dough, causing it to rise and become light and fluffy. It also imparts a characteristic flavor and aroma to bread. Yeast is a natural additive that has been used for thousands of years in bread-making.


Another important additive in bakery products is emulsifiers. Emulsifiers are substances that help to blend and stabilize ingredients that would otherwise separate, such as oil and water. They are commonly used in cakes, pastries, and other baked goods to improve the texture and prolong the shelf life of the product. Some common emulsifiers used in the bakery industry include lecithin, mono- and diglycerides, and polyglycerol esters.


Preservatives are also commonly used in bakery products to extend their shelf life. These additives help to prevent the growth of mold and bacteria, which can cause spoilage and food poisoning. Some common preservatives used in bakery products include sodium propionate, potassium sorbate, and calcium propionate.

Food colorings and flavorings are also often used in bakery products to enhance their appearance and taste. These additives can be natural or artificial, and can range from simple vanilla extract to complex chemical compounds.


While additives can improve the quality and shelf life of bakery products, they can also have potential health concerns. Some additives have been linked to allergic reactions, and others have been found to be carcinogenic or otherwise harmful. It is important to check the ingredients list on bakery products and be aware of any potential health concerns.


In conclusion, additives play an important role in the bakery industry, enhancing the taste, texture, appearance and preservation of baked goods. However, it is important to be aware of the potential health concerns associated with certain additives and to check the ingredients list on bakery products. Consumers can also opt for homemade baked goods or products from bakeries that use natural or minimally processed ingredients.


FLAVOR BOOSTERS AND ENHANCERS

In the world of clean-label development, adding to the conundrum for developers is the need for products or methods to be low-cost, seamless on the processing floor and look good on a label, falling within the clean-label vernacular. As a result, desirable flavor attributes like sweetness, richness and more subtle under- or overtones can be lost during manufacturing.


In addition, using ingredients such as caffeine, vitamins, meat analogs, dairy replacements and other on-trend ingredients like CBD can leave behind undesirable flavors and off-notes for the product developer to eliminate or reduce.


Enter the world of clean-label bitter blockers, flavor maskers, flavor potentiators and flavor extenders, all designed to help the processor dial in the exact flavor attributes desired.


Boosting flavor is rarely straightforward. It usually involves elevating some flavor notes while blocking others. Flavor enhancers, potentiators and extenders typically function in tandem with a specific flavor. At the same time, maskers and blockers are used against the flavor of the near-finished product. The ingredient chosen to mask or enhance may only act as a neutral ingredient that binds to or counteracts specific flavor components. The ingredient used might carry its weight in the formulation and elevate the overall flavor.


FLAVOR POTENTIATORS

Flavor potentiators are designed to elevate flavor and mouthfeel. In the savory category, glutamic acid is king. Glutamic acid occurs naturally in foods such as tomatoes, cheese, mushrooms, seaweed, yeast extracts and fermented foods. Extracts, powders and concentrates of all of these products can be used to boost umami and kokumi notes and reduce sodium.


Boasting 10-30% less sodium than traditionally brewed soy sauces, Kikkoman’s line of Natural Flavor Enhancers (made from naturally fermented soy) adds glutamic-rich umami notes while keeping your label clean. Possessing a mild aroma and a balanced, brothy flavor, the NFE line comes in liquid and powder forms and a powder enriched with yeast extract for an even more potent umami punch.


Speaking of sodium reduction, there are several options to reduce sodium without compromising flavor. One popular approach is to use a salt that provides a bigger salt kick than NaCl salt. Another method might be to use sodium chloride in a slightly different form. A smaller crystal, for instance, would have more contact points with taste receptors than a bigger crystal, creating a salty flavor with less salt in the formula.


Moving to sugar reduction, high-intensity sweeteners such as monk fruit and stevia carry bitter or oddly cooling finishing notes when used at high levels. Masking products derived from licorice, vanilla and citrus can hide bitter notes by contributing pleasing notes to the overall flavor profile.

Adding other sweet ingredients is another approach to boost sweetness. For instance, fruit concentrates add sweetness without adding sugar. As a masking agent in seed formulations, vanilla is a powerful tool. It is especially good at blocking the bitterness of chocolate and covering up the beany notes of plant-based nutrition bars and meal replacement beverages. The spices we associate with the holidays, such as nutmeg, cinnamon, cardamom, and clove, can also boost sweetness without added sugar.


MASKERS VS. BLOCKERS

Flavor maskers are widely used to offset bitter notes, countering the bitterness of added caffeine, for example. Additionally, a masker can be used to mellow a flavor that might overwhelm overall flavor synergy.


The goal is to target a specific undesired flavor note from an ingredient that is less than delicious but required nonetheless. Many masking agents are inherently clean-label. For instance, sucrose, vanilla and licorice add sweetness and distract the tongue from undesirable flavors.


While flavor maskers distract the palate from unwanted flavor notes, flavor blockers bind directly with taste receptors to stop the consumer from noticing the off-flavor in question. The blocker inhibits receptor function by binding with one of our 25 taste receptor types (T2Rs) on the tongue, blocking off notes of a flavor from being perceived.


Fermented mycelia, derived from mushrooms, act this way, blocking the bitter flavor signals from traveling to the brain. MycoTechnology uses a process called “liquid culture” or “submerged fermentation” to innovate mycelia-based flavor enhancers and blockers. Instead of allowing mycelium to ferment (or digest) solid material, they “train” their mushrooms to digest a liquid substrate. The resulting products can be separated, dried, or extracted for specific compounds.


Ingredients that enhance or mask flavors in food manufacturing vary greatly. They can be carried on just about any medium a developer can dream up— proteins, carbohydrates, fats, as well as minerals and unique chemical compounds. There’s a flavor enhancer to suit just about any formulation and ingredient manufacturers will also work with developers to come up with the exact formulation to fit any product.




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